What’s Inside You Part VII

Written by Nguyen Griggs

Dr. Nguyen "Tom" Griggs is a native Houstonian. He holds a doctorate degree in Educational Leadership and a master's degree in Business and Administration from the University of Houston. For the past 18 years, Dr. Griggs dedicated himself to college students' success in and out of the classroom. As a sensei at TNT JuJitsu, he coaches troubled kids to take better paths. He is an instructor in Verbal Judo and has certificates in Advanced Negotiations and Conflict Resolution from Notre Dame's Mendoza School of Business.
Jan 14, 2012
At last we have arrived at the end of this series. We started with a sense of youthfulness/fun and then we discussed pain. Then we talked about traditions, followed by wisdom and fear. The last post looked at my personal favorite, which was determination. Finally, we have come to the end. This series came about as the result of a series of experiences and I felt the need to share this. So if the series comes off as a bit odd or not the usual progression of traits in a personal development series, that’s because it mirrors the daily experience we call life. Not everything that happens to us makes sense but we can make something sensible from the things that happen to us. The fact that I finished this series is for me a personal triumph and its completion represents the last component in the What’s Inside of You Series: Victory.

This series wasn’t meant to be a how-to-guide on being a better person or a treatise on loving your humanity; this was simply a series of personal reflections on events that happened and shaped me recently. These events made me realize certain elements that are within me. But I’m sure that there is a strong relevance to all people in what has been written. If some of you wish you could still maintain that childlike exuberance or even a youthful naiveté about events in your life, then we share something. If you’ve read this series and discovered that it made you reflect and even smile, then I too am smiling. In that sense, we are both victorious.

Victory is definable but not easily recognizable to many people. Sometimes, we set off on a journey or to attain a goal only to realize what we sought is not what we attained. I thought that earning a doctorate degree would magically make the world see how amazing I was and how super driven and smart I am. As foolish as this sounds, it is often our egos, disguised through the subconscious that drives us. Earning a doctorate degree gave me something altogether better; a sense of knowing that I grew as a person and accomplished something that was very difficult and rigorous. I learned humility, patience and the art of letting go.

When I had the 17 drafts of my chapter 1 rejected over the period of two years, it required all three of those traits. When I was required to travel to conferences, answer endless, pointless questions about my writing and research, it required those three qualities. At the very end, when I was trying my very best to run through the hoops, get signatures (I once had to get a signature from the home one of my professors before 7:30am), turn in various forms and listen to people go on about every little minute detail of my work, it was worth it. I earned my degree, I became Dr. Griggs and that was for me, a win. But as I reflect and see my abilities to work with people, push myself through difficulties and treat people with respect and patience as result of attaining my doctorate, I realize that who I became was the true victory. No bitterness, no anger nor resentment but gratitude for becoming a better, more complete person.

It’s interesting what we think or believe when we are undertaking a tough journey or a traveling on a hard road. We always envision this massive, climactic battle until the very end where the enemy is vanquished and we emerge bloody but victorious. The very end of my journey (after the final defense of my dissertation) was anything but exciting.

At the end of my journey, as unbelievably difficult as it was, it came down to simply paper work, making copies and bureaucratic steps. The completion was merely a series of simple steps and all of the truly defining hard work was done. Like so many other people, I had put more emotion and mental investment in the whole thing than needed to be. Secondly, to quote Les Brown regarding journeys an dreams “What you become in pursuit of your dream is more important that the accomplishment of your dream.” Perhaps the greatest aspect of my victory came from who I am now, what I’m doing with my life and the fact that I have one of many stories to share with you all. Thanks for reading and sharing and we’ll be seeing each other in the future.

Your life remains a gift. Share it generously and wisely.

 

Coming Soon: Dear friends, I’m excited about yet another step in my road to sharing and growing with others. Soon, I will be presenting my first product offer. I’m excited because I’m going to build and elaborate upon these 7 traits that I’ve been writing about and there will e-books, interviews and action plans. This will be fun, exciting and inspiring so please stay tuned and I appreciate your support.