What’s Inside of You Part V

Written by Nguyen Griggs

Dr. Nguyen "Tom" Griggs is a native Houstonian. He holds a doctorate degree in Educational Leadership and a master's degree in Business and Administration from the University of Houston. For the past 18 years, Dr. Griggs dedicated himself to college students' success in and out of the classroom. As a sensei at TNT JuJitsu, he coaches troubled kids to take better paths. He is an instructor in Verbal Judo and has certificates in Advanced Negotiations and Conflict Resolution from Notre Dame's Mendoza School of Business.
Nov 28, 2011

I stand at a unique point where I am going to make some changes that are basically scary. It’s hard when you’ve done something for a while and then realize that you have to adjust or alter your path. That “difficulty” brings with it something that many of us hate to admit exists; but good people, I feel a bit of fear. That’s right, I gots me a case of the ole fashion “fraidy cat” syndrome. I mean let’s face the fact that we all enjoy a regular schedule, consistent actions and working towards a goal. It’s even better when we are doing something that brings us joy and growth but there are times when we also grow to a certain point and we need to change.

Fear is not neither bad nor good according to many people. If nothing else, it is simply an emotion and like all emotions it is how we allow are actions to be dictated or affected that determines a state of things being good or bad.

My fear is actually based on the possible reaction of a good friend and mentor that I must spend a little less time with in order to further pursue my dreams and career choices. But more to the point, I fear that my friend wont be so understanding of why I am doing this. But I remember in a great speech that Les Brown gave he talked about times when you must go and find your volcano and conquer it. Well I’ve found mine and it’s time for me to go after it and claim it.

When I was probably 3 or 4 years old, my dad let me hang from the side view mirror of his old Chevy pickup. This was the 70’s so the truck had metal rods that held the mirrors to the truck doors. Well I would climb up and hang onto the support rods and begin to cry when I wanted to get down but was afraid of falling. My dad would tell me that I would turn red and cry profusely and finally when I had nothing else left in me except tears and fear, I would fall. Now the ground was only 8 inches from my feet and I was shocked and scared. I would pick myself up, dust myself off, wipe my tear stained face and runny nose and guess what? Climb up and do it again. That’s right. I didn’t learn my lesson the 4 to 6 other times that I did climbed up and fall.

But I ask you good people: What lesson did I learn? Is it childhood foolishness or was I simply enjoying the taste or experience of the struggle and the fear to make me stronger? Now I was too young to really believe that the latter was plausible but I find this to be a great teaching point. Sometimes we have to admit that fear is within all of us and how we interact or experience that fear and what it causes us to do defines a great deal of our character. There will be times when all we can do is acknowledge the fear, calm ourselves, strengthen our resolve and act in spite of the fear. Remember! It’s only an emotion and once we are truly intimate with any of our emotions, we can and should act accordingly. The next time fear materializes in a situation (depending on what it is), acknowledge it, become intimate with it and act accordingly. Your life is a gift my friends, share it generously and wisely.